Pat Pepe from West Florida Components – Podcast Transcript

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Shaun Ryan:  [0:03] Hi, I’m Shaun Ryan from SLI Systems, and this is the eCommerce Podcast. Today, I’m talking to Pat Pepe, owner and founder of West Florida Components. Welcome Pat.

Pat Pepe:  [0:12] Hi, Shaun. Thank you for having me.

Shaun:  [0:15] It’s great to have you on here. Now a traditional question to get us started: What was the first thing you ever bought online?

Pat:  [0:22] That was definitely on eBay. I think it was 1998 or ’99. I stumbled on to the eBay site after hearing something about it on the news. I starting looking through all the collectables, and I found a vintage Mystery Date board game. That was a game I had played when I was younger in the 1970s, so I wanted to buy it to share with my daughters. [0:45] After that, I was amazed at all the vintage board games there. I started collecting them, and I now have a whole collection on my wall in my game room of all old game boards from my youth.

Shaun:  [0:55] Fantastic. That’s a perfect use of eBay. Did your daughters like the game?

Pat:  [1:01] Oh yeah, absolutely. They had heard about it from my sister and I, and thought it was the most ridiculous game ever. But now they understood why I was looking for it so desperately.

Shaun:  [1:12] Fantastic. What was your most recent purchase?

Pat:  [1:19] That would be from Amazon. I bought a new charger for my Kindle. I was going through Kindle withdrawal because I had lost my charger.

Shaun:  [1:26] Oh no. I assume it was a seamless experience on Amazon.

Pat:  [1:33] Absolutely.

Shaun:  [1:34] Yep, buying an Amazon product from Amazon. Are you enjoying your Kindle?

Pat:  [1:39] I am, very much. I definitely sold on it. I’ve only had it six months, but I don’t know how I ever lived without it.

Shaun:  [1:46] Yeah, I know. I’m struggling to read old fashioned books now.

Pat:  [1:50] Yeah, that’s the thing. They’re great for just about everything I can get my hands on for business reading and whatnot. For example, I just had to go to the book store the other day and buy one that had color photos, because that’s just one thing I can’t get on my Kindle and it does make a difference in some of the books. It’s kind of interesting to have a balance.

Shaun:  [2:09] Yeah, definitely. Now Pat, can you give us just a little bit of background on yourself? How did you get to be the owner and founder of West Florida Components?

Pat:  [2:19] I had moved to Florida about 20 years ago. And I was looking to start a small business, to do something part time. After, of course, falling in love with eBay, I decided to try my hand selling some things on eBay. [2:35] By accident, I was having a garage sale, getting rid of some of my daughter’s toys. And I had a Fischer‑Price dollhouse, which I sold off piece‑by‑piece on eBay. I netted about $200, and the whole dollhouse probably cost about $50 brand new. So I realized there was definitely some money to be made there.

[2:54] My dad had been in the electronic components business for many years, and so I grabbed some of the parts from him and tried list them on eBay. Sure enough, they started selling. Back then, there was no category for electronic components. I was listing everything in Ham radio supplies.

[3:13] When everything was starting to sell, I was amazed. So I decided to form a small business with another partner. About five years ago, I struck out on my own, and I’ve been doing it full‑time ever since.

Shaun:  [3:24] Fantastic. That’s amazing stuff, from breaking out of the garage. But I suppose you had that family history there that made you think of selling the components.

Pat:  [3:31] Yes.

Shaun:  [3:32] So how big has the company gotten now? Is it still just you doing it, or do you have a team of people?

Pat:  [3:39] I do have a team. We’re small. It’s still a family business. My daughters work for me, and I hire family and friends whenever I can. And I have a small staff of people who are not related to me. I have my assistant for example, and we have some people in the warehouse. But we are a small, family owned business.

Shaun:  [3:59] Excellent. So how do you differentiate yourself against larger companies?

Pat:  [4:04] Right from the very beginning, we decided we needed to distinguish ourselves from the larger companies, to stand out, because they have 50,000 different parts available, and maybe $50 million worth of inventory. Since we were a small business, we decided we had to do something different. [4:22] So we try to be the alternative to the large catalog houses. That is, we don’t make anyone purchase a minimum. They can buy as little as one part or as many as we have. A lot of the large catalog houses charge a $100 minimum, for example.

[4:41] And we’re also small enough to provide personal service, but we’re large enough now to be able to stock many different products. We have 10,000 products listed between our website and all our other venues.

Shaun:  [4:55] Wow. Do you stock all of those components?

Pat:  [4:58] Yes, we sure do. That’s the other thing that we do that’s different. We only list on our website what we have on stock. We don’t try and sell other people’s inventory at the same time. We only list our own.

Shaun:  [5:12] Right, so you know if you buy it from you, it’s coming directly from you, and you should be able to ship it straight away.

Pat:  [5:17] Absolutely, exactly. That’s correct, that’s correct.

Shaun:  [5:21] I can see that would be very valuable, especially if there’s a component that you’re looking for and you just need it straightaway.

Pat:  [5:29] Exactly. That’s correct.

Shaun:  [5:31] Now Pat, can you share with us how much you sell online per month?

Pat:  [5:36] Well, I can tell you we’re almost at our goal this month of $50 000 this month.

Shaun:  [5:42] That’s fantastic. You’re business ‑‑ are you still growing? And how fast have you been growing year on year?

Pat:  [5:55] The economy the way it has been, we’ve been kind of slack the past maybe three years or so. We’ve seen a big change from a lot of companies buying our parts to manufacture a product, to people buying smaller quantities of it to repair things. [6:13] When times are good, companies are buying our parts to make products. When times are not so good, people are fixing things. So we always have sales going on. Our sales have been pretty flat for the past year or so, but this month has been pretty good so far. We’re seeing a little bit of a revival. We’re hoping that it keeps on going.

Shaun:  [6:31] Yeah. I’ve heard the term “flat is the new growth” used particularly over the last year during the recession. So staying flat over that time is still quite an achievement.

Pat:  [6:45] Yeah. We’re real happy with our growth over the past couple of years. We don’t want to get that much bigger, because this is manageable and we still have a life outside of the business. My favorite saying is, “Never get too busy making a living that you forget to make a life.”

Shaun:  [7:02] Yep, exactly. You’ve got to have time to play those board games, don’t you?

Pat:  [7:07] That’s correct. We try.

Shaun:  [7:09] Tell me, how do you get your customers to your site? How do they find you?

Pat:  [7:18] We sell on many different venues. Primarily our sales right now are through our website. We’ve worked very hard the past three years on making our site optimized for the search engines to find us. So we do rank very high if people are searching for part numbers, they’ll find us very often. We rank very high for many of the key phrases too. [7:40] But we also upload our products to Google’s database through the product feed. And we still sell a little bit on eBay; not so much anymore. We also have a store on Amazon, which is pretty successful. Actually, one of the coolest things now is we are selling directly from Facebook, which is neat.

Shaun:  [7:59] That’s interesting. So how does that work? You have a fan page or something and people buy them through there?

Pat:  [8:07] That’s correct. What is does is, it is an app that I found pretty recently, it’s called shop tab, and you install it on your fan page. You import through a product feed, the same as you would through Google base, for example. You upload your products, and you can upload as many as you want to pay for because it is a recurring fee. [8:28] What it does is, you actually set up a little store when the person clicks on the item, it brings you right to the website. So, it is a direct transfer right to the website. It’s cool, because you can then have the ability to actually place individual products on your fan page, or post the ads on your own personal page and so on. It’s a great, great tool.

Shaun:  [8:49] That’s really interesting. Is it a free tool, or do you pay them if you make a sale through the….

Pat:  [8:57] No, the only thing you pay ‑‑ there is no commission or anything, you only pay them a flat fee starting at, I think, $10 a month, for 500 products. If you have more than that, you pay an incremental fee.

Shaun:  [9:10] Excellent. I hadn’t heard of that before. That’s great. Now, tell me a little bit about your online store. What technologies are you using to run it?

Pat:  [9:21] We buy on a Miva Merchant Platform.

Shaun:  [9:24] OK, great.

Pat:  [9:25] That’s the past three years. We are very pleased with it, and we have been able to scale our business perfectly on it. We have no plans on leaving any time soon.

Shaun:  [9:35] Excellent. So, do you manage all of that yourself, or have you had some outside people come and help you build that?

Pat:  [9:45] There’s a couple of people that I’ve met through an organization that I belong to, the Internet Merchants Association. I met a designer through that organization that hooked me up with the even merchant platform. She’s familiar with installing the module and the plug in that you need to really customize your store. [10:06] I also met other people along the way who write custom stuff for me as needed. There is a treasure trove of developers that write custom modules for the Miva Merchant Platform. You can change it any way you want. It’s a pretty basic store to begin with, what you can do to grow it and scale it is just amazing. I’m very pleased with that. So I contract out.

Shaun:  [10:31] Now, that makes a lot of sense. Are you making any improvements to your online store at the moment?

Pat:  [10:38] We’re always a work in progress. We just the other day changed out all the buttons on the website. It’s funny how we do little bits of testing here and there to see what’s working and what’s not working. We’ve always tried to keep our site very simple, because we know that if someone is coming to our site, they are there to look for specific parts. [11:02] We just try to give them what they want. We have done a lot of testing with our customers and potential customers. We really know that the simpler for our customers, the better. Certainly not because of their intelligence, it is because they are a very focused group. Lot of engineers, electrical engineers and so on.

Shaun:  [11:20] Yes, they can be very specific with what they want.

Pat:  [11:22] Exactly. So, we just try and give them exactly what they want. We’re always making improvements as we hear comments, feedback from customers. We run surveys and do some user testing.

Shaun:  [11:33] Excellent. Can you share with us some of the plans you have for the upcoming year for improvements to your site?

Pat:  [11:39] Sure. Actually, right now, I have my developer writing a custom script to change ‑‑we have a header with our product, graphics on the top, and we’re going to change that to a slide so that it can be changed by the customer. They can scroll through the images rather than through the left side categories. [12:02] We have done some testing with our slides on another website. It has been very successful for people wanting to browse graphically.

Shaun:  [12:10] OK. Sounds great, and it is the sort of thing we can test and get customer feedback and see whether it makes a difference to the sales.

Pat:  [12:18] Correct. Correct.

Shaun:  [12:20] Another thing you mentioned is you are a part of the ‑‑ I forget the name of the society. The Interactive Marketers?

Pat:  [12:29] Yes, the Internet Merchants Society.

Shaun:  [12:32] Internet Merchants Association. Can you tell us a little bit about that?

Pat:  [12:36] Sure. I’ve been a member since about four years, since the organization was founded. It’s a non‑profit organization. What we do, our main goal is to educate e‑commerce sellers and we are a group that is based in the US and we have an online forum where we share ideas and we discuss different topics, different venues, different platforms. [13:02] We have sponsors and they get to talk to our members about their products. For example, we had eBay take out Amazon as sponsors. We also have Miva Merchant. We just brought them on board. So, what they do is, we hold a conference once a year where we all meet out in Las Vegas. It’s tied to the ASD Sourcing Convention, so that our members can go source some products while they are out in Las Vegas, and attend our educational seminars.

[13:34] That’s what we basically do. Like I said, it’s a non‑profit, so everything we do is just for the members. I happen to be on the board, I’m planning the conference right now, our next conference is March. It’s something I truly believe in. I feel very passionate about it because I feel like there is such a need to have e‑commerce sellers learn to sell correctly, to sell the right way, to not make the same mistakes we made in the beginning.

[14:02] They need to know SCO for example, that we have a resource for it. We have some SCO speakers come to the conference and we have some one from Network Solutions going to do a presentation on social media. Trying to keep up with all the changes that are in e‑commerce space.

Shaun:  [14:19] Yes, there’s definitely a lot of changes and this is no indication that it is going to change anytime soon, from what I can see.

Pat:  [14:26] Absolutely.

Shaun:  [14:28] So, if anyone is interested in the Internet Merchants Association, then how do they find out some more about it?

Pat:  [14:35] They can go right to our website, which is IMAmerchants.org.

Shaun:  [14:46] Excellent. I presume there is some sort of membership fee, or is it free to join?

Pat:  [14:55] It’s $99 per year for bronze members, which covers most business members. Then the higher level memberships we have for businesses who want to interact with our bronze members, who are presented at our conferences and so on. They go all the way up from $599 all the way up for the business members.

Shaun:  [15:18] That sounds really interesting, I’ll have to check that out.

Pat:  [15:20] I hope you do.

Shaun:  [15:21] Well, Pat, we are going to wrap it up, then. I just want to thank you very much for your time. You’ve shared with us some of your interesting experiences and told us about the Internet Merchants Association. So I just want to thank you very much for coming on today.

Pat:  [15:36] Thank you so much for having me. I hope to speak with you again.

Shaun:  [15:38] Thank you Pat. I’m Shaun Ryan from SLI Systems and that was the eCommerce Podcast. Tune in next time. 

Shaun Ryan:  [0:03] Hi, I’m Shaun Ryan from SLI Systems, and this is the eCommerce Podcast. Today, I’m talking to Pat Pepe, owner and founder of West Florida Components. Welcome Pat.

Pat Pepe:  [0:12] Hi, Shaun. Thank you for having me.

Shaun:  [0:15] It’s great to have you on here. Now a traditional question to get us started: What was the first thing you ever bought online?

Pat:  [0:22] That was definitely on eBay. I think it was 1998 or ’99. I stumbled on to the eBay site after hearing something about it on the news. I starting looking through all the collectables, and I found a vintage Mystery Date board game. That was a game I had played when I was younger in the 1970s, so I wanted to buy it to share with my daughters. [0:45] After that, I was amazed at all the vintage board games there. I started collecting them, and I now have a whole collection on my wall in my game room of all old game boards from my youth.

Shaun:  [0:55] Fantastic. That’s a perfect use of eBay. Did your daughters like the game?

Pat:  [1:01] Oh yeah, absolutely. They had heard about it from my sister and I, and thought it was the most ridiculous game ever. But now they understood why I was looking for it so desperately.

Shaun:  [1:12] Fantastic. What was your most recent purchase?

Pat:  [1:19] That would be from Amazon. I bought a new charger for my Kindle. I was going through Kindle withdrawal because I had lost my charger.

Shaun:  [1:26] Oh no. I assume it was a seamless experience on Amazon.

Pat:  [1:33] Absolutely.

Shaun:  [1:34] Yep, buying an Amazon product from Amazon. Are you enjoying your Kindle?

Pat:  [1:39] I am, very much. I definitely sold on it. I’ve only had it six months, but I don’t know how I ever lived without it.

Shaun:  [1:46] Yeah, I know. I’m struggling to read old fashioned books now.

Pat:  [1:50] Yeah, that’s the thing. They’re great for just about everything I can get my hands on for business reading and whatnot. For example, I just had to go to the book store the other day and buy one that had color photos, because that’s just one thing I can’t get on my Kindle and it does make a difference in some of the books. It’s kind of interesting to have a balance.

Shaun:  [2:09] Yeah, definitely. Now Pat, can you give us just a little bit of background on yourself? How did you get to be the owner and founder of West Florida Components?

Pat:  [2:19] I had moved to Florida about 20 years ago. And I was looking to start a small business, to do something part time. After, of course, falling in love with eBay, I decided to try my hand selling some things on eBay. [2:35] By accident, I was having a garage sale, getting rid of some of my daughter’s toys. And I had a Fischer‑Price dollhouse, which I sold off piece‑by‑piece on eBay. I netted about $200, and the whole dollhouse probably cost about $50 brand new. So I realized there was definitely some money to be made there.

[2:54] My dad had been in the electronic components business for many years, and so I grabbed some of the parts from him and tried list them on eBay. Sure enough, they started selling. Back then, there was no category for electronic components. I was listing everything in Ham radio supplies.

[3:13] When everything was starting to sell, I was amazed. So I decided to form a small business with another partner. About five years ago, I struck out on my own, and I’ve been doing it full‑time ever since.

Shaun:  [3:24] Fantastic. That’s amazing stuff, from breaking out of the garage. But I suppose you had that family history there that made you think of selling the components.

Pat:  [3:31] Yes.

Shaun:  [3:32] So how big has the company gotten now? Is it still just you doing it, or do you have a team of people?

Pat:  [3:39] I do have a team. We’re small. It’s still a family business. My daughters work for me, and I hire family and friends whenever I can. And I have a small staff of people who are not related to me. I have my assistant for example, and we have some people in the warehouse. But we are a small, family owned business.

Shaun:  [3:59] Excellent. So how do you differentiate yourself against larger companies?

Pat:  [4:04] Right from the very beginning, we decided we needed to distinguish ourselves from the larger companies, to stand out, because they have 50,000 different parts available, and maybe $50 million worth of inventory. Since we were a small business, we decided we had to do something different. [4:22] So we try to be the alternative to the large catalog houses. That is, we don’t make anyone purchase a minimum. They can buy as little as one part or as many as we have. A lot of the large catalog houses charge a $100 minimum, for example.

[4:41] And we’re also small enough to provide personal service, but we’re large enough now to be able to stock many different products. We have 10,000 products listed between our website and all our other venues.

Shaun:  [4:55] Wow. Do you stock all of those components?

Pat:  [4:58] Yes, we sure do. That’s the other thing that we do that’s different. We only list on our website what we have on stock. We don’t try and sell other people’s inventory at the same time. We only list our own.

Shaun:  [5:12] Right, so you know if you buy it from you, it’s coming directly from you, and you should be able to ship it straight away.

Pat:  [5:17] Absolutely, exactly. That’s correct, that’s correct.

Shaun:  [5:21] I can see that would be very valuable, especially if there’s a component that you’re looking for and you just need it straightaway.

Pat:  [5:29] Exactly. That’s correct.

Shaun:  [5:31] Now Pat, can you share with us how much you sell online per month?

Pat:  [5:36] Well, I can tell you we’re almost at our goal this month of $50 000 this month.

Shaun:  [5:42] That’s fantastic. You’re business ‑‑ are you still growing? And how fast have you been growing year on year?

Pat:  [5:55] The economy the way it has been, we’ve been kind of slack the past maybe three years or so. We’ve seen a big change from a lot of companies buying our parts to manufacture a product, to people buying smaller quantities of it to repair things. [6:13] When times are good, companies are buying our parts to make products. When times are not so good, people are fixing things. So we always have sales going on. Our sales have been pretty flat for the past year or so, but this month has been pretty good so far. We’re seeing a little bit of a revival. We’re hoping that it keeps on going.

Shaun:  [6:31] Yeah. I’ve heard the term “flat is the new growth” used particularly over the last year during the recession. So staying flat over that time is still quite an achievement.

Pat:  [6:45] Yeah. We’re real happy with our growth over the past couple of years. We don’t want to get that much bigger, because this is manageable and we still have a life outside of the business. My favorite saying is, “Never get too busy making a living that you forget to make a life.”

Shaun:  [7:02] Yep, exactly. You’ve got to have time to play those board games, don’t you?

Pat:  [7:07] That’s correct. We try.

Shaun:  [7:09] Tell me, how do you get your customers to your site? How do they find you?

Pat:  [7:18] We sell on many different venues. Primarily our sales right now are through our website. We’ve worked very hard the past three years on making our site optimized for the search engines to find us. So we do rank very high if people are searching for part numbers, they’ll find us very often. We rank very high for many of the key phrases too. [7:40] But we also upload our products to Google’s database through the product feed. And we still sell a little bit on eBay; not so much anymore. We also have a store on Amazon, which is pretty successful. Actually, one of the coolest things now is we are selling directly from Facebook, which is neat.

Shaun:  [7:59] That’s interesting. So how does that work? You have a fan page or something and people buy them through there?

Pat:  [8:07] That’s correct. What is does is, it is an app that I found pretty recently, it’s called shop tab, and you install it on your fan page. You import through a product feed, the same as you would through Google base, for example. You upload your products, and you can upload as many as you want to pay for because it is a recurring fee. [8:28] What it does is, you actually set up a little store when the person clicks on the item, it brings you right to the website. So, it is a direct transfer right to the website. It’s cool, because you can then have the ability to actually place individual products on your fan page, or post the ads on your own personal page and so on. It’s a great, great tool.

Shaun:  [8:49] That’s really interesting. Is it a free tool, or do you pay them if you make a sale through the….

Pat:  [8:57] No, the only thing you pay ‑‑ there is no commission or anything, you only pay them a flat fee starting at, I think, $10 a month, for 500 products. If you have more than that, you pay an incremental fee.

Shaun:  [9:10] Excellent. I hadn’t heard of that before. That’s great. Now, tell me a little bit about your online store. What technologies are you using to run it?

Pat:  [9:21] We buy on a Miva Merchant Platform.

Shaun:  [9:24] OK, great.

Pat:  [9:25] That’s the past three years. We are very pleased with it, and we have been able to scale our business perfectly on it. We have no plans on leaving any time soon.

Shaun:  [9:35] Excellent. So, do you manage all of that yourself, or have you had some outside people come and help you build that?

Pat:  [9:45] There’s a couple of people that I’ve met through an organization that I belong to, the Internet Merchants Association. I met a designer through that organization that hooked me up with the even merchant platform. She’s familiar with installing the module and the plug in that you need to really customize your store. [10:06] I also met other people along the way who write custom stuff for me as needed. There is a treasure trove of developers that write custom modules for the Miva Merchant Platform. You can change it any way you want. It’s a pretty basic store to begin with, what you can do to grow it and scale it is just amazing. I’m very pleased with that. So I contract out.

Shaun:  [10:31] Now, that makes a lot of sense. Are you making any improvements to your online store at the moment?

Pat:  [10:38] We’re always a work in progress. We just the other day changed out all the buttons on the website. It’s funny how we do little bits of testing here and there to see what’s working and what’s not working. We’ve always tried to keep our site very simple, because we know that if someone is coming to our site, they are there to look for specific parts. [11:02] We just try to give them what they want. We have done a lot of testing with our customers and potential customers. We really know that the simpler for our customers, the better. Certainly not because of their intelligence, it is because they are a very focused group. Lot of engineers, electrical engineers and so on.

Shaun:  [11:20] Yes, they can be very specific with what they want.

Pat:  [11:22] Exactly. So, we just try and give them exactly what they want. We’re always making improvements as we hear comments, feedback from customers. We run surveys and do some user testing.

Shaun:  [11:33] Excellent. Can you share with us some of the plans you have for the upcoming year for improvements to your site?

Pat:  [11:39] Sure. Actually, right now, I have my developer writing a custom script to change ‑‑we have a header with our product, graphics on the top, and we’re going to change that to a slide so that it can be changed by the customer. They can scroll through the images rather than through the left side categories. [12:02] We have done some testing with our slides on another website. It has been very successful for people wanting to browse graphically.

Shaun:  [12:10] OK. Sounds great, and it is the sort of thing we can test and get customer feedback and see whether it makes a difference to the sales.

Pat:  [12:18] Correct. Correct.

Shaun:  [12:20] Another thing you mentioned is you are a part of the ‑‑ I forget the name of the society. The Interactive Marketers?

Pat:  [12:29] Yes, the Internet Merchants Society.

Shaun:  [12:32] Internet Merchants Association. Can you tell us a little bit about that?

Pat:  [12:36] Sure. I’ve been a member since about four years, since the organization was founded. It’s a non‑profit organization. What we do, our main goal is to educate e‑commerce sellers and we are a group that is based in the US and we have an online forum where we share ideas and we discuss different topics, different venues, different platforms. [13:02] We have sponsors and they get to talk to our members about their products. For example, we had eBay take out Amazon as sponsors. We also have Miva Merchant. We just brought them on board. So, what they do is, we hold a conference once a year where we all meet out in Las Vegas. It’s tied to the ASD Sourcing Convention, so that our members can go source some products while they are out in Las Vegas, and attend our educational seminars.

[13:34] That’s what we basically do. Like I said, it’s a non‑profit, so everything we do is just for the members. I happen to be on the board, I’m planning the conference right now, our next conference is March. It’s something I truly believe in. I feel very passionate about it because I feel like there is such a need to have e‑commerce sellers learn to sell correctly, to sell the right way, to not make the same mistakes we made in the beginning.

[14:02] They need to know SCO for example, that we have a resource for it. We have some SCO speakers come to the conference and we have some one from Network Solutions going to do a presentation on social media. Trying to keep up with all the changes that are in e‑commerce space.

Shaun:  [14:19] Yes, there’s definitely a lot of changes and this is no indication that it is going to change anytime soon, from what I can see.

Pat:  [14:26] Absolutely.

Shaun:  [14:28] So, if anyone is interested in the Internet Merchants Association, then how do they find out some more about it?

Pat:  [14:35] They can go right to our website, which is IMAmerchants.org.

Shaun:  [14:46] Excellent. I presume there is some sort of membership fee, or is it free to join?

Pat:  [14:55] It’s $99 per year for bronze members, which covers most business members. Then the higher level memberships we have for businesses who want to interact with our bronze members, who are presented at our conferences and so on. They go all the way up from $599 all the way up for the business members.

Shaun:  [15:18] That sounds really interesting, I’ll have to check that out.

Pat:  [15:20] I hope you do.

Shaun:  [15:21] Well, Pat, we are going to wrap it up, then. I just want to thank you very much for your time. You’ve shared with us some of your interesting experiences and told us about the Internet Merchants Association. So I just want to thank you very much for coming on today.

Pat:  [15:36] Thank you so much for having me. I hope to speak with you again.

Shaun:  [15:38] Thank you Pat. I’m Shaun Ryan from SLI Systems and that was the eCommerce Podcast. Tune in next time.